katblaque
katblaque:

thepeoplesrecord:

TW: Rape, transmisogyny - A transgender woman says she was locked in a cell with her rapistSeptember 29, 2014
The odds were already against Zahara Green when she entered prison on May 10, 2012. Prisons have long been plagued by a culture of sexual harassment and assault, but Green was a transgender woman in an all-male facility — making her about 13 times more likely to be sexually assaulted than a non-transgender inmate,according to a 2009 study.
Green told BuzzFeed News she distinctly remembers her first day in general population at Rogers State Prison, a facility about an hour and a half outside of Savannah, Georgia. It was two months into her sentence, and she said she can still envision the officer dropping her off at her dorm and walking away.
“I kind of just felt that he was letting me out with the wolves. You’re on your own. It clicked in my mind,” she said. “I found my bed, I placed my stuff on my bed, and then I sat there for about an hour and people were just coming in and out as if this was some kind of showcase.”
Under federal law, states must seriously consider transgender inmates’ safety concerns — and the Georgia Department of Corrections has said it has zero tolerance for sexual misconduct. Yet the state of Georgia placed Green in a men’s prison, where she faced a greater risk of being assaulted. Around the country, decisions on transgender inmates’ placement and their level of protection are ultimately made on a case-by-case basis. But according to her lawsuit, these often ambiguous decisions and lack of safety oversight may have played a role in Zahara Green’s alleged rape by another inmate — not while they mingled in general population, but while she was being secured in “protective custody.”
Green was approached by Darryl Ricard — a high-ranking gang member within the prison, she said — right after moving to the dorm at Rogers. He was in his seventh year of a life sentence for aggravated child molestation, rape, and kidnapping.
“He basically made me his property,” she said.
Over the next few weeks, as Ricard repeatedly coerced her to perform oral sex on him, Green would write to prison administrative staff about the unsafe environment for transgender and homosexual inmates, Green said. Rogers State Prison housed one other transgender woman at the time, to Green’s knowledge, although Green was the only one receiving hormone treatment. In one letter, she says she mentioned being sexually targeted by Ricard.
Shortly afterward, she requested to be put into protective custody, which is typically a solitary cell for prisoners who believe their safety is at risk, carefully monitored by prison officials. What allegedly happened next makes up the bulk of a lawsuit Green and her Atlanta-based lawyer Mario Williams filed in May against the prison’s warden, deputy warden, and two correctional officers. Last week, they filed another complaint against an additional 13 additional correctional officers.
On Sept. 21, 2012, Green and Ricard were separately admitted into protective custody. According to Green, Ricard was the chief reason she had requested the special security measures. But for still unclear reasons, when Green entered her protective custody cell around 4:30 a.m., “Ricard was waiting” there, the complaint says. “Ricard raped Green, and the Defendants to this action all knew Ricard was going to rape (or at the very least, sexually assault) Green yet permitted Ricard to sexually assault Green.” The correction officers allegedly “condoned” the rape.
According to Williams, Green’s attorney, Green and Ricard had been assigned to different protective custody cells, and Ricard should have never been allowed in Green’s cell. Nearly 24 hours passed, though security checks were supposed to be made at least every 30 minutes. Williams said he believes the Georgia Department of Corrections knew about the situation and did nothing to prevent Green’s assault. The department declined to comment on the case to BuzzFeed News, citing pending litigation.
“Everyone has to wonder how Green’s assailant got put in protective custody on the same day and same time as Green. Then permitted to be in Green’s cell for nearly 24 hours,” Williams said. “This case is about more than Ricard. There has been official misconduct.”In a court document responding to Green’s complaint, a lawyer for the defendants — repeatedly referring to Green as “he” — denied that the deputy warden had read any letter about Ricard’s “oral sodomy” of Green. The response noted that Green’s mother had contacted the prison about her daughter’s safety concerns, but alleged that when asked directly, Green said she “was not afraid.” The response also said that Green was “at some point … placed in the same cell as inmate Darryl Ricard.”
While the case moves forward, some local and national groups have begun rallying around Green. One of the first people to reach out to her was Kenneth Glasgow of the Ordinary People Society. He describes Green as “humble and quiet,” but also “tormented and traumatized,” unable to talk at length about the incident; while Green spoke to BuzzFeed News on Wednesday, she once paused to keep from crying.
After the alleged assault — when Green eventually got a guard’s attention — a sergeant came to the cell, she said. He apparently saw Ricard with a razor blade in his hand and stuck pepper spray through an opening in the cell door. Ricard quickly surrendered, Green said, and they were both separately removed from the cell. Later, Green was taken to a sexual assault examination nurse, who performed a rape kit.
Green was kept in protective custody for the next week and a half. Then she was transferred to Georgia State Prison, a facility down the street, where she immediately requested protective custody. Eventually she was placed in a unit made up a several single cells housing all transgender inmates. “I was the sixth or seventh on transgender hormone therapy,” Green said. She felt safe there.
But it wasn’t until her final transfer — to Atlanta Transitional Facility — that Green said she felt her life begin to change for the better.
Green was 17 when she began transitioning. It wasn’t long after that she began shoplifting from various Walmarts — landing her with a prison sentence and a life ban from the retailer. She says she doesn’t think this anymore, but at the time, theft felt like her only option.
“I did not think it was possible to find a job as a transgender person in Georgia. All the trans people I knew were either shoplifting, forging checks, or prostituting,” she said. “I didn’t know a single transgender person who had a job.”
At the transitional center, “they opened my eyes to another way,” she said. She’s been on parole since her release in March. In August, she began school, working to become a paralegal. She has a job at Walgreens. She’s helped her other transgender friends find jobs. She’s 25 now and said, “There’s a better life for me.”
She hopes one outcome of the lawsuit is that transgender people are not tested out in general population before officials decide it’s not a safe fit. While the federal Prison Rape Elimination Act forces states to take transgender inmates’ safety concerns into consideration, Harper Jean Tobin of the National Center for Transgender Equality said it’s not clear that they always do. (In Georgia, another transgender inmate is currently fighting for her access to hormone therapy in a high-profile case.)
“If institutions are able to make the culture shift … toward not making those auto assumptions but really focusing on what is keeping each person safe,” Tobin said, “they will start making those placements in women’s facilities more often.”
Source

Wow I am just now seeing this and i’m really hurt. I know her. We collaborated with each other on my first Collab channel Trans Youth Channel. I’m really saddened by hearing this.  I hope she’s ok.

katblaque:

thepeoplesrecord:

TW: Rape, transmisogyny - A transgender woman says she was locked in a cell with her rapist
September 29, 2014

The odds were already against Zahara Green when she entered prison on May 10, 2012. Prisons have long been plagued by a culture of sexual harassment and assault, but Green was a transgender woman in an all-male facility — making her about 13 times more likely to be sexually assaulted than a non-transgender inmate,according to a 2009 study.

Green told BuzzFeed News she distinctly remembers her first day in general population at Rogers State Prison, a facility about an hour and a half outside of Savannah, Georgia. It was two months into her sentence, and she said she can still envision the officer dropping her off at her dorm and walking away.

“I kind of just felt that he was letting me out with the wolves. You’re on your own. It clicked in my mind,” she said. “I found my bed, I placed my stuff on my bed, and then I sat there for about an hour and people were just coming in and out as if this was some kind of showcase.”

Under federal law, states must seriously consider transgender inmates’ safety concerns — and the Georgia Department of Corrections has said it has zero tolerance for sexual misconduct. Yet the state of Georgia placed Green in a men’s prison, where she faced a greater risk of being assaulted. Around the country, decisions on transgender inmates’ placement and their level of protection are ultimately made on a case-by-case basis. But according to her lawsuit, these often ambiguous decisions and lack of safety oversight may have played a role in Zahara Green’s alleged rape by another inmate — not while they mingled in general population, but while she was being secured in “protective custody.”

Green was approached by Darryl Ricard — a high-ranking gang member within the prison, she said — right after moving to the dorm at Rogers. He was in his seventh year of a life sentence for aggravated child molestation, rape, and kidnapping.

“He basically made me his property,” she said.

Over the next few weeks, as Ricard repeatedly coerced her to perform oral sex on him, Green would write to prison administrative staff about the unsafe environment for transgender and homosexual inmates, Green said. Rogers State Prison housed one other transgender woman at the time, to Green’s knowledge, although Green was the only one receiving hormone treatment. In one letter, she says she mentioned being sexually targeted by Ricard.

Shortly afterward, she requested to be put into protective custody, which is typically a solitary cell for prisoners who believe their safety is at risk, carefully monitored by prison officials. What allegedly happened next makes up the bulk of a lawsuit Green and her Atlanta-based lawyer Mario Williams filed in May against the prison’s warden, deputy warden, and two correctional officers. Last week, they filed another complaint against an additional 13 additional correctional officers.

On Sept. 21, 2012, Green and Ricard were separately admitted into protective custody. According to Green, Ricard was the chief reason she had requested the special security measures. But for still unclear reasons, when Green entered her protective custody cell around 4:30 a.m., “Ricard was waiting” there, the complaint says. “Ricard raped Green, and the Defendants to this action all knew Ricard was going to rape (or at the very least, sexually assault) Green yet permitted Ricard to sexually assault Green.” The correction officers allegedly “condoned” the rape.

According to Williams, Green’s attorney, Green and Ricard had been assigned to different protective custody cells, and Ricard should have never been allowed in Green’s cell. Nearly 24 hours passed, though security checks were supposed to be made at least every 30 minutes. Williams said he believes the Georgia Department of Corrections knew about the situation and did nothing to prevent Green’s assault. The department declined to comment on the case to BuzzFeed News, citing pending litigation.

“Everyone has to wonder how Green’s assailant got put in protective custody on the same day and same time as Green. Then permitted to be in Green’s cell for nearly 24 hours,” Williams said. “This case is about more than Ricard. There has been official misconduct.”

In a court document responding to Green’s complaint, a lawyer for the defendants — repeatedly referring to Green as “he” — denied that the deputy warden had read any letter about Ricard’s “oral sodomy” of Green. The response noted that Green’s mother had contacted the prison about her daughter’s safety concerns, but alleged that when asked directly, Green said she “was not afraid.” The response also said that Green was “at some point … placed in the same cell as inmate Darryl Ricard.”

While the case moves forward, some local and national groups have begun rallying around Green. One of the first people to reach out to her was Kenneth Glasgow of the Ordinary People Society. He describes Green as “humble and quiet,” but also “tormented and traumatized,” unable to talk at length about the incident; while Green spoke to BuzzFeed News on Wednesday, she once paused to keep from crying.

After the alleged assault — when Green eventually got a guard’s attention — a sergeant came to the cell, she said. He apparently saw Ricard with a razor blade in his hand and stuck pepper spray through an opening in the cell door. Ricard quickly surrendered, Green said, and they were both separately removed from the cell. Later, Green was taken to a sexual assault examination nurse, who performed a rape kit.

Green was kept in protective custody for the next week and a half. Then she was transferred to Georgia State Prison, a facility down the street, where she immediately requested protective custody. Eventually she was placed in a unit made up a several single cells housing all transgender inmates. “I was the sixth or seventh on transgender hormone therapy,” Green said. She felt safe there.

But it wasn’t until her final transfer — to Atlanta Transitional Facility — that Green said she felt her life begin to change for the better.

Green was 17 when she began transitioning. It wasn’t long after that she began shoplifting from various Walmarts — landing her with a prison sentence and a life ban from the retailer. She says she doesn’t think this anymore, but at the time, theft felt like her only option.

“I did not think it was possible to find a job as a transgender person in Georgia. All the trans people I knew were either shoplifting, forging checks, or prostituting,” she said. “I didn’t know a single transgender person who had a job.”

At the transitional center, “they opened my eyes to another way,” she said. She’s been on parole since her release in March. In August, she began school, working to become a paralegal. She has a job at Walgreens. She’s helped her other transgender friends find jobs. She’s 25 now and said, “There’s a better life for me.”

She hopes one outcome of the lawsuit is that transgender people are not tested out in general population before officials decide it’s not a safe fit. While the federal Prison Rape Elimination Act forces states to take transgender inmates’ safety concerns into consideration, Harper Jean Tobin of the National Center for Transgender Equality said it’s not clear that they always do. (In Georgia, another transgender inmate is currently fighting for her access to hormone therapy in a high-profile case.)

“If institutions are able to make the culture shift … toward not making those auto assumptions but really focusing on what is keeping each person safe,” Tobin said, “they will start making those placements in women’s facilities more often.”

Source

Wow I am just now seeing this and i’m really hurt. I know her. We collaborated with each other on my first Collab channel Trans Youth Channel. I’m really saddened by hearing this.  I hope she’s ok.

Anonymous asked:

They're are mass genocides going on in Africa and the biggest problem in the world in your mind is someone calling a dude who has a dick he. That's all I'm saying

1) Don’t think of it as the world’s biggest problem. Us being killed with no justice is higher up there but still below what’s going on in many places around the world.

2) 

transqueermediaexchange

transitiontransmission:

Depictions of trans people in the media can have an enormous impact on the way society views them. On Road is working to change attitudes in media organisations

Depictions in mainstream comedy of minority groups have an enormous impact on the way society views them. Little Britain’s famous “I’m a Laydee” sketch perpetuated the offensive stereotype of transgender people as nothing more than deluded “blokes in dresses.” Far from being a harmless joke, portrayals like these can be directly linked to the verbal and physical abuse often suffered by many of the UK’s estimated 600,000 transgender people.

However, earlier this month the BBC announced that they were commissioning the UK’s first ever transgender comedy sitcom, with a rare defining detail - the main character who is trans isn’t the usual derogatory stereotype but a fully fleshed out, authentic sounding trans woman. A person like anyone else, who happens to be trans. The part will be played by Rebecca Root. It’s a direct result of the work we’ve been doing to change the way the media represents one of the country’s most marginalised and least understood communities.

Research carried out in 2009 revealed that 78% of British trans people felt that the media portrayals they saw were either inaccurate or highly inaccurate. It’s clear attitudes need to change.

All About Trans, a project led by social enterprise On Road, is changing the way the British media represents and portrays transgender people, one journalist at a time. We’re a small team and our approach is simple but powerful. We change the way an influential media professional (one that can pull strings and make things happen) feels about trans people by encouraging personal connections. Most media professionals admit they have never knowingly had a conversation with someone who is gender variant so we remedy this through what we call “the interactions”.

Traditional diversity workshops for journalists often miss the mark by focusing on theoretical dos and don’ts, and we know from experience that the most senior and influential people rarely attend them. It’s first-hand experience of people and relationships that really leads to understanding. We organise two hour gatherings to suit the journalist, in the office, or out and about, creating the right environment to encourage open conversation, questions, and sharing of interests with a group of diverse trans people who will challenge perceptions and build an emotional connection.

The outcomes are many and varied. They’ve ranged from three critically acclaimed BBC Radio One documentaries presented by Paris Lees (who met commissioning editor Piers Bradford during one of our interactions at the BBC), documentary commissions from Channel 4, articles by trans people in local and national newspapers and dozens of radio interviews and television appearances from Question Time to Saturday Live - and the aforementioned first trans sitcom ‘Boy Meets Girl’, which has its roots in the BBC Writers Room Trans Comedy Award, a scheme born at a camp we ran at Channel 4 in 2011.

Collaborating with producers and executives, encouraging new content and complimenting them when they get it right - as opposed to pointing out all the ways they’ve got it wrong in the past - goes a long way.

The work has been so successful largely due to the extraordinary group of 200 passionate and diverse transgender volunteers who have helped us to engage with 160 media professionals so far across print, broadcast and online. The interactions we facilitate are led by local trans people of all ages and backgrounds and in just a year and a half, we’ve met with, amongst others, senior executives at The Observer, The Independent, The Sun, Daily Mail, Channel 4, BBC, CBBC, Press Complaints Commission, Press Association and journalists for regional newspapers such as the Scotland Herald and Dorset Echo.

Restorative justice plays a part too. In June, we met with the managing director of The Sun, Stig Abell, and his colleagues. They sat down with Dr Kate Stone (who we supported with a landmark negotiation with six national newspapers over transgender reporting after articles focused on her trans status after she suffered a near death experience with a stag) and Ayla Holdom, a Royal Air Force Flight Lieutenant who was outed by The Sun a few years ago. During this meeting, they explained how they’d been hurt and the editors apologised and removed the offensive headlines and news reports from their site.

On an interaction, it’s vital that participants feel comfortable to speak their minds and be open with each other. And people can make mistakes, for example with pronouns or terminology, but it’s important to explain the mistake, hear the apology, learn from it and move on.

Our approach, put simply, is not about pointing the finger and telling journalists what to say or not say. It’s about respecting the talent and position of the media professional and creating the right environment for them to be champions of the cause and to take it upon themselves to change the way their newspaper, programme or organisation deals with trans people.

Change can’t happen overnight, and behaviours and attitudes take time to shift, but human connections are sustainable, and as we work to maintain them, we’re starting to see big, exciting changes in the way the media works.

tipsfortransfolks
demigenders:

transbun:

This is really messy and i dunno if its even legible my wrists been acting weird all day.Tbh i prefer the insults to how i draw over the blatant misgendering. 

I felt this was extremely relevant to us, especially for those DFAB demigirls who get it really bad.Your gender is valid, and don’t let people tell you it’s not. We support you 100%, and there are plenty of others who do as well.- Ramona

demigenders:

transbun:

This is really messy and i dunno if its even legible my wrists been acting weird all day.

Tbh i prefer the insults to how i draw over the blatant misgendering. 

I felt this was extremely relevant to us, especially for those DFAB demigirls who get it really bad.

Your gender is valid, and don’t let people tell you it’s not. We support you 100%, and there are plenty of others who do as well.

- Ramona